threads of our fabric

Reflections on navigating between two cultures and understanding the self-awareness process

Courtney’s House April 15, 2013

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sharon Asonganyi @ 10:21 pm
Tags: , , ,

A little over a year ago, I wrote a post about human trafficking triggered by series of busts very near to home. It was different from my usual posts on acculturation, however, it is an issue that affects young children irrespective of race/ethnicity. Human trafficking is a business and domestically it is increasing which places boys and girls in danger if we do not talk to them rather than shield them. I had the honor of sitting in on an informational presentation session by Tina Frundt, founder and director of Courtney’s House. Her talk introduced me to another shocking reality about the underworld of human trafficking. Young girls who are tricked into leaving home and held captive as sex slaves. Tina’s approach is very much outside of the box. Everything is designed with the victims in mind from having an all female staff to unusual work hours typically when most of us are in REM sleep. Some of the facts she presented were shocking:

  • As many as 2.8 million children live on the streets. One out of every three will be lured into prostitution within 48 hours of leaving home
  • The average age of entry into prostitution for a child victim in the United States is 12-14 years old
  • Pimp-controlled juvenile prostitution is closely associated with: escort and massage services, private dancing, drinking and photographic clubs, major sporting and recreational events, major cultural events, conventions, and selected tourist destinations.

Courtney’s House is doing a phenomenal job addressing this issue in a sensitive and appropriate manner. Please consider supporting this organization who are giving the invisible children hope and a future.

 

2 Responses to “Courtney’s House”

  1. maameafrica Says:

    Thanks for sharing! This is an issue that doesn’t get as much attention and people seem to believe that it is not a huge issue in this country.

  2. maameafrica Says:

    Thanks for sharing! This issue is a larger problem here but a lot of people don’t realize that.


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